Cheap supermarkets linked to weight

News Shopper: Cheap supermarkets linked to weight Cheap supermarkets linked to weight

SHOPPING at Lidl may provide fat discounts but is also associated with pounds that are better shed than saved, a study has shown.

Customers of cut price supermarkets are likely to be heavier and fatter than those who shop at expensive city centre stores, say researchers.

The French study, which named Lidl as an example of a "hard discount" supermarket, found a similar trend among people who visited stores far from where they lived.

Discount shopping was associated with higher body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) even after adjusting for social background and distance from the store.

However, the link was stronger among shoppers with a poorer education.

Efforts to improve eating habits, such as promoting healthy foods, should target specific supermarkets, the scientists suggest.

The study, published in the online journal Public Library of Science ONE, was conducted in Paris between 2007 and 2008.

A total of 7,131 people shopping in more than 1,000 different supermarkets were surveyed.

Researchers compared customers from a range of Parisian supermarkets, including the upmarket Monoprix chain, large "hypermarkets" such as Cora, and the "hard discount" stores Aldi, Ed and Lidl.

The team led by Dr Basile Chaix, from the INSERM research institute in Paris, wrote: "After controlling for individual and residential neighbourhood SES (socio-economic status) and distance to the supermarket, and using the Monoprix brand (expensive citymarkets located in city centres) as the referent, participants shopping in certain supermarket brands, especially hypermarkets such as Cora or in hard discount supermarkets such as Ed or Lidl, had greater BMI and WC."

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There was a "strong interaction" between education levels and discount shopping.

The association between shopping in a hard discount store and greater body weight was "markedly stronger for lower education levels" said the researchers.

Conversely, people who shopped in organic stores were much more likely to have a lower BMI and slimmer waists.

Strategies targeting food-buying behaviour in specific supermarkets may be an "efficient strategy" because supermarkets "are the very place where dietary preferences are concretely materialised and translated into a definite set of purchased foods", they said.

Comments (2)

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2:10pm Thu 5 Apr 12

Outandabout says...

What a stupid study, what was the point? A competent school leaver could have come up with this. "However, the link was stronger among shoppers with a poorer education" the statistic would be the same for buying goods in a pound shop. people from poorer backgrounds are more likely to have a poorer diet and so be over weight AND shop in cheaper stores. I suspect this is someone from an expensive shopping chain doing their propaganda against cheaper stores
What a stupid study, what was the point? A competent school leaver could have come up with this. "However, the link was stronger among shoppers with a poorer education" the statistic would be the same for buying goods in a pound shop. people from poorer backgrounds are more likely to have a poorer diet and so be over weight AND shop in cheaper stores. I suspect this is someone from an expensive shopping chain doing their propaganda against cheaper stores Outandabout
  • Score: 0

12:36pm Fri 6 Apr 12

dag says...

Complete tosh. Lidl fruit and veggies are amongst the best and a lot cheaper. Sea bass, salmon also available. I regularly shop in Lidl because it's cheap doesn't mean to say I'm fat...... I have a good diet and use a gym twice a week. Is this article written by one of the big supermarkets?
Complete tosh. Lidl fruit and veggies are amongst the best and a lot cheaper. Sea bass, salmon also available. I regularly shop in Lidl because it's cheap doesn't mean to say I'm fat...... I have a good diet and use a gym twice a week. Is this article written by one of the big supermarkets? dag
  • Score: 0

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