Michael Gove forced into U-turn on GCSEs

Michael Gove forced into U-turn on GCSEs

Michael Gove forced into U-turn on GCSEs

First published in Bexley © by

EDUCATION Secretary Michael Gove has been forced to abandon his flagship plan to scrap GCSEs and replace them with a new English Baccalaureate.

The move was said to follow pressure from within the coalition from the Liberal Democrats as well as criticism from MPs across the political spectrum.

Last week the cross-party Commons Education Committee said the Government had "not proved its case" that GCSEs should be abolished in key academic subjects.

Labour said that it was a "humiliating climbdown" for one of the most high-profile members of the Cabinet.

Mr Gove will now go before the Commons on Thursday to set out alternative proposals to reform GCSEs - reducing the role played by course work.

He had originally wanted to introduce the new EBacc certificate in England in the five core academic areas of English, maths, science, languages and humanities - history or geography.

Each of the core subjects would have been handed to a single examination board - a move he argued was essential to prevent boards "dumbing down" standards to attract more schools. However according to reports in The Independent and The Daily Telegraph, officials warned the plan could fall foul of EU procurement rules.

Shadow education secretary Stephen Twigg said Mr Gove should have listened to warnings that the scheme would not work.

He said: "It shows why he should have listened to business leaders, headteachers and experts in the first place and not come up with a plan on the back of an envelope. Pupils and parents need certainty now. Michael Gove must now make clear whether he will abandon his narrow, out of date plans altogether or merely try to delay them."

A Department for Education source said: "We do not comment on leaks. Mr Gove will make a statement to the House tomorrow."

Do you think the GCSE system should be changed? Have your say below.

Comments (5)

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8:42am Thu 7 Feb 13

Polly Staight says...

The problem with the education system is that like the NHS, it is run by the state and therefore...

Not fit for purpose!
The problem with the education system is that like the NHS, it is run by the state and therefore... Not fit for purpose! Polly Staight
  • Score: 0

9:11am Thu 7 Feb 13

Eagles_Man says...

So, Gove's plans have been scuppered by a combination of the Lib Dems, vested interests, the EU and spineless backbenchers.

When do we get a say?

(And what Polly Staight said).
So, Gove's plans have been scuppered by a combination of the Lib Dems, vested interests, the EU and spineless backbenchers. When do we get a say? (And what Polly Staight said). Eagles_Man
  • Score: 0

12:25pm Thu 7 Feb 13

sol worrell says...

saw gove on me ipad visiting some school in london..... seriously , not sure if he has any kids of his own , but if he did , he would not have sent them to this school..... walk around smiling and muttering under his breath..... most people know what he was thinking.....
saw gove on me ipad visiting some school in london..... seriously , not sure if he has any kids of his own , but if he did , he would not have sent them to this school..... walk around smiling and muttering under his breath..... most people know what he was thinking..... sol worrell
  • Score: 0

12:55pm Thu 7 Feb 13

j.j. says...

The dumbing down of Britain continues because of unions' and politicians' vested interests. The problem is that our poorly educated children will increasingly struggle in the global competition for jobs with German engineers, French bankers, Asian doctors, American scientists, Polish builders etc. The fact that the educational establishement is unable to admit to this huge problem and instead prefer to hide behind fabricated strong results proves that they are not fit to run the education system. It was brave for Gove to stand up for the future generations - and shame on the politicians who allow the dumbing down to continue.
The dumbing down of Britain continues because of unions' and politicians' vested interests. The problem is that our poorly educated children will increasingly struggle in the global competition for jobs with German engineers, French bankers, Asian doctors, American scientists, Polish builders etc. The fact that the educational establishement is unable to admit to this huge problem and instead prefer to hide behind fabricated strong results proves that they are not fit to run the education system. It was brave for Gove to stand up for the future generations - and shame on the politicians who allow the dumbing down to continue. j.j.
  • Score: 0

4:22pm Sat 9 Feb 13

nearly right all the time says...

All these politicians make me laugh:its
one rule for them one rule for us!

Look at Diane Abbott, local comp no good, never mind my son can go private:those who say their chrildren
are at state school still have private
tution at home.....rest of us "hard luck"

our chuldren and their teachers are mucked about, bullied, (by govts~league tables )

I agree in years to come if we do not give our children a better education
we will decline, not only as a nation,
but as a society as well
All these politicians make me laugh:its one rule for them one rule for us! Look at Diane Abbott, local comp no good, never mind my son can go private:those who say their chrildren are at state school still have private tution at home.....rest of us "hard luck" our chuldren and their teachers are mucked about, bullied, (by govts~league tables ) I agree in years to come if we do not give our children a better education we will decline, not only as a nation, but as a society as well nearly right all the time
  • Score: 0

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