Woman airlifted to hospital after crash in Woolwich Road, Charlton

The London air ambulance

The London air ambulance

First published in News News Shopper: Photograph of the Author by , deputy news editor

TWO women have been taken to hospital after an accident involving a lorry and a bus.

Ambulances were called just after 2.20pm to reports of the accident in Woolwich Road, Charlton.

Two ambulances and a single responder were joined at the scene by an air ambulance.

One woman, aged 45, was taken by air to the Royal London Hospital to be treated for arm injuries.

A second woman was taken by ambulance to Queen Elizabeth Hospital with minor head injuries.

Around 20 firefighters attended the scene from Woolwich, Greenwich and Lewisham fire stations.

The woman who injured her arm was trapped on the bus and had to be rescued by firefighters.

The incident has shut Woolwich Road (A206) both ways between Victoria Way and Charlton Church Lane.

The 161 bus route is also being diverted between Charlton Station and East Greenwich via Anchor and Hope Lane, Bugsby's Way and Pear Tree Way.

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Comments (15)

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4:50pm Tue 12 Jul 11

Yankees says...

That must have been some arm injury to have a very costly air ambulance to take someone to a East London hospital when Queen Elizabeth Hospital is only half mile away.
That must have been some arm injury to have a very costly air ambulance to take someone to a East London hospital when Queen Elizabeth Hospital is only half mile away. Yankees
  • Score: 0

6:31pm Tue 12 Jul 11

julidebee says...

Yankees wrote:
That must have been some arm injury to have a very costly air ambulance to take someone to a East London hospital when Queen Elizabeth Hospital is only half mile away.
Yes it must of been!!! wonder if you would be thinking about the money if it was somebody close to you.....
[quote][p][bold]Yankees[/bold] wrote: That must have been some arm injury to have a very costly air ambulance to take someone to a East London hospital when Queen Elizabeth Hospital is only half mile away.[/p][/quote]Yes it must of been!!! wonder if you would be thinking about the money if it was somebody close to you..... julidebee
  • Score: 0

7:06pm Tue 12 Jul 11

animalmagic1 says...

Im glad u are a qualified doctor 2 judge??Did u no that the more extensive wound 2 an arm could b life threating.... thank u
Im glad u are a qualified doctor 2 judge??Did u no that the more extensive wound 2 an arm could b life threating.... thank u animalmagic1
  • Score: 0

7:17pm Tue 12 Jul 11

missyd32 says...

Yankees wrote:
That must have been some arm injury to have a very costly air ambulance to take someone to a East London hospital when Queen Elizabeth Hospital is only half mile away.
rather a silly comment to make, I agree it does cost to use HEMS but this is a decision that is never made lightly!
[quote][p][bold]Yankees[/bold] wrote: That must have been some arm injury to have a very costly air ambulance to take someone to a East London hospital when Queen Elizabeth Hospital is only half mile away.[/p][/quote]rather a silly comment to make, I agree it does cost to use HEMS but this is a decision that is never made lightly! missyd32
  • Score: 0

7:28pm Tue 12 Jul 11

animalmagic1 says...

The reason they would attend is because... the extent is never known... till on scene... and true it isnt taken lightly at all.....thank u
The reason they would attend is because... the extent is never known... till on scene... and true it isnt taken lightly at all.....thank u animalmagic1
  • Score: 0

7:51pm Tue 12 Jul 11

Yankees says...

My point is,

I do not need to be a doctor I'm a tax payer, we've got a very expensive Hospital mile away that seems not to be able to deal with "any" emergency, it has a Accident and Emergency Department and replaced 2 Hospitals (Greenwich & Brook) when the Brook was open, I sliced my had in a motorbike accident and the Hospital managed to repair me and my hand minus one finger.
I can understand using a air ambulance
in the countryside or on motorways but not mile away from a major hospital.
My point is, I do not need to be a doctor I'm a tax payer, we've got a very expensive Hospital mile away that seems not to be able to deal with "any" emergency, it has a Accident and Emergency Department and replaced 2 Hospitals (Greenwich & Brook) when the Brook was open, I sliced my had in a motorbike accident and the Hospital managed to repair me and my hand minus one finger. I can understand using a air ambulance in the countryside or on motorways but not mile away from a major hospital. Yankees
  • Score: 0

9:36pm Tue 12 Jul 11

dolphin7 says...

Yankees....I totally understand what you are saying but HEMS activate on certain calls made to the Ambulance Service due to unknown injuries. Hospitals have now changed slightly & The Royal London, Kings & St Georges are major trauma centres. They have specialist staff to deal with such significant injuries & HEMS decide which hospital the patient goes to & how they are transported i.e helicopter or ambulance. Arm inuries can be life threatening & so the desicion reached would have been in the patients best interest....at least now you know, should you ever require the emergecny services you will be transported to the best place!
Yankees....I totally understand what you are saying but HEMS activate on certain calls made to the Ambulance Service due to unknown injuries. Hospitals have now changed slightly & The Royal London, Kings & St Georges are major trauma centres. They have specialist staff to deal with such significant injuries & HEMS decide which hospital the patient goes to & how they are transported i.e helicopter or ambulance. Arm inuries can be life threatening & so the desicion reached would have been in the patients best interest....at least now you know, should you ever require the emergecny services you will be transported to the best place! dolphin7
  • Score: 0

9:41am Wed 13 Jul 11

mpeaple275 says...

Yankees wrote:
My point is, I do not need to be a doctor I'm a tax payer, we've got a very expensive Hospital mile away that seems not to be able to deal with "any" emergency, it has a Accident and Emergency Department and replaced 2 Hospitals (Greenwich & Brook) when the Brook was open, I sliced my had in a motorbike accident and the Hospital managed to repair me and my hand minus one finger. I can understand using a air ambulance in the countryside or on motorways but not mile away from a major hospital.
QE has also took on queen marys hospital in sidcup and QE ant the best hospital by far i was took there with a cut to my face to be told they can't do nothing and i would have to go to lewisham hospital to be seen do and then they look at it stitched it up and made a mess off it i ended up having it done at qe where i was at 8 hours ago lol AND HEMS. Is not funed by the taxpayer its all charity donations
[quote][p][bold]Yankees[/bold] wrote: My point is, I do not need to be a doctor I'm a tax payer, we've got a very expensive Hospital mile away that seems not to be able to deal with "any" emergency, it has a Accident and Emergency Department and replaced 2 Hospitals (Greenwich & Brook) when the Brook was open, I sliced my had in a motorbike accident and the Hospital managed to repair me and my hand minus one finger. I can understand using a air ambulance in the countryside or on motorways but not mile away from a major hospital.[/p][/quote]QE has also took on queen marys hospital in sidcup and QE ant the best hospital by far i was took there with a cut to my face to be told they can't do nothing and i would have to go to lewisham hospital to be seen do and then they look at it stitched it up and made a mess off it i ended up having it done at qe where i was at 8 hours ago lol AND HEMS. Is not funed by the taxpayer its all charity donations mpeaple275
  • Score: 0

12:08pm Wed 13 Jul 11

the wall says...

Yhey can also be called by any of the emergency services, such as the fire brigade or police.
Yhey can also be called by any of the emergency services, such as the fire brigade or police. the wall
  • Score: 0

1:30pm Wed 13 Jul 11

Marty1979 says...

I recall comments about use of HEMS earlier this year - a motorcyclist was injured on Farnborough Way, probably less than a mile from the PRU.

http://www.newsshopp
er.co.uk/news/884213
7.FARNBOROUGH__A21_F
arnborough_Way_close
d_following_crash/

One of the replies was "The decision as to which hospital to go to is not only based on geography, but is based on a number of factors, including type of injury, speed to get there etc."

Although, despite the speed of a helicopter, I doubt it could have flown to (in that case) Whitechapel quicker than the ambulance could have driven to the PRU
Whilst accepting that the Royal London is a "major trauma centre", if they get all serious injuries how long before the A&E at the PRU or QE get downgraded?
I recall comments about use of HEMS earlier this year - a motorcyclist was injured on Farnborough Way, probably less than a mile from the PRU. http://www.newsshopp er.co.uk/news/884213 7.FARNBOROUGH__A21_F arnborough_Way_close d_following_crash/ One of the replies was "The decision as to which hospital to go to is not only based on geography, but is based on a number of factors, including type of injury, speed to get there etc." Although, despite the speed of a helicopter, I doubt it could have flown to (in that case) Whitechapel quicker than the ambulance could have driven to the PRU Whilst accepting that the Royal London is a "major trauma centre", if they get all serious injuries how long before the A&E at the PRU or QE get downgraded? Marty1979
  • Score: 0

2:25pm Wed 13 Jul 11

jca111 says...

Marty1979 wrote:
I recall comments about use of HEMS earlier this year - a motorcyclist was injured on Farnborough Way, probably less than a mile from the PRU.

http://www.newsshopp

er.co.uk/news/884213

7.FARNBOROUGH__A21_F

arnborough_Way_close

d_following_crash/

One of the replies was "The decision as to which hospital to go to is not only based on geography, but is based on a number of factors, including type of injury, speed to get there etc."

Although, despite the speed of a helicopter, I doubt it could have flown to (in that case) Whitechapel quicker than the ambulance could have driven to the PRU
Whilst accepting that the Royal London is a "major trauma centre", if they get all serious injuries how long before the A&E at the PRU or QE get downgraded?
I wrote that original comment. What has to be made clear is this; all A&E departments can deal with the injuries that are required in an emergency. i.e. those to save life, stabalise etc

However, some centres are are better at dealing with say crush injuries. It may be the case that the injuries to the arm were so severe that the local A&E could stabilise her, but she would be better off in Royal London due to the nature of the injuries.

Time to hospital is not the only factor, but the best treatment for the case will also be a factor.

It is for the highly trained doctors and paramedics to decide which hospital is best, not someone on the internet who doesn't know what injuries are involved, the time to hospitals, what each hospital has to offer etc. Cost should be the lowest factor on the list (even tho the AE is a charity).
[quote][p][bold]Marty1979[/bold] wrote: I recall comments about use of HEMS earlier this year - a motorcyclist was injured on Farnborough Way, probably less than a mile from the PRU. http://www.newsshopp er.co.uk/news/884213 7.FARNBOROUGH__A21_F arnborough_Way_close d_following_crash/ One of the replies was "The decision as to which hospital to go to is not only based on geography, but is based on a number of factors, including type of injury, speed to get there etc." Although, despite the speed of a helicopter, I doubt it could have flown to (in that case) Whitechapel quicker than the ambulance could have driven to the PRU Whilst accepting that the Royal London is a "major trauma centre", if they get all serious injuries how long before the A&E at the PRU or QE get downgraded?[/p][/quote]I wrote that original comment. What has to be made clear is this; all A&E departments can deal with the injuries that are required in an emergency. i.e. those to save life, stabalise etc However, some centres are are better at dealing with say crush injuries. It may be the case that the injuries to the arm were so severe that the local A&E could stabilise her, but she would be better off in Royal London due to the nature of the injuries. Time to hospital is not the only factor, but the best treatment for the case will also be a factor. It is for the highly trained doctors and paramedics to decide which hospital is best, not someone on the internet who doesn't know what injuries are involved, the time to hospitals, what each hospital has to offer etc. Cost should be the lowest factor on the list (even tho the AE is a charity). jca111
  • Score: 0

4:29pm Wed 13 Jul 11

dolphin7 says...

Aswell as major trauma centres there are also cath labs- for people experiencing a heart attack & stroke units at certain hospitals. Yes this involves by-passing other hospitals to get there but wouldnt you want to be in the correct place should you experience any life threatening/changing condition. I agree other hospitals can be reached quicker but the overall outcome may not be the best as the other hospitals do not have the correct equipment or staff to deal with said injuries/illness. Ambulance staff are trained to be able to stabilise patients en route & to get them to designated hospitals in a quick enough time so not to delay further treatment. As said, there are many factors involved in reaching decisions about which hospital is best but the biggest key is that it is always in the patients best interest!
Aswell as major trauma centres there are also cath labs- for people experiencing a heart attack & stroke units at certain hospitals. Yes this involves by-passing other hospitals to get there but wouldnt you want to be in the correct place should you experience any life threatening/changing condition. I agree other hospitals can be reached quicker but the overall outcome may not be the best as the other hospitals do not have the correct equipment or staff to deal with said injuries/illness. Ambulance staff are trained to be able to stabilise patients en route & to get them to designated hospitals in a quick enough time so not to delay further treatment. As said, there are many factors involved in reaching decisions about which hospital is best but the biggest key is that it is always in the patients best interest! dolphin7
  • Score: 0

4:35pm Wed 13 Jul 11

Make Life says...

the wall wrote:
Yhey can also be called by any of the emergency services, such as the fire brigade or police.
the fire brigade can not and will not call for an air ambulance. they can only advise and it is then down to the main control room to send it out
[quote][p][bold]the wall[/bold] wrote: Yhey can also be called by any of the emergency services, such as the fire brigade or police.[/p][/quote]the fire brigade can not and will not call for an air ambulance. they can only advise and it is then down to the main control room to send it out Make Life
  • Score: 0

9:32pm Thu 14 Jul 11

Turbodan says...

The bus was a Route 180 and it was VWL26 from the go-ahead at Belvedere garage
the bus has since been moved upto Bexleyheath Garage
the woman lost a arm on the bus.
but this company also had a big crash the other week in camberwell
The bus was a Route 180 and it was VWL26 from the go-ahead at Belvedere garage the bus has since been moved upto Bexleyheath Garage the woman lost a arm on the bus. but this company also had a big crash the other week in camberwell Turbodan
  • Score: 0

5:07pm Mon 18 Jul 11

London's Air Ambulance says...

As an employee of London’s Air Ambulance I thought we should give some sort of reply to your comments.

Although we will not comment on a particular patient, in respect of their confidentiality, we can give you some generic information to clarify any confusion.

When we are called out, it is either by request for assistance from the London Ambulance Service or another member of the emergency services. We only attend the most serious injuries in London and are called upon for our medical team’s expertise in trauma care. It is our aim to bring the emergency room to the patient in the quickest time possible. We often perform procedures at the incident which are normally only seen in the hospital emergency room, as the patients we are called to may not always survive the distance to hospital. We will help to stabilise the patient and will then make the call as to the closest hospital to deal with that specific injury. There are four trauma hospitals in London which deal with multi injuries, however certain specialities are only available in certain hospitals and our senior trauma doctors will make the call in the patient’s best interest. The distance, time and the patient’s condition will be taken into consideration when deciding on the mode of transport to take them to hospital.

I hope this has clarified any confusion.

You can learn more about our charity on www.londonsairambula
nce.co.uk. We are also on Facebook (London’s Air Ambulance) and Twitter (@thehelipad) if you wish to chat further.
As an employee of London’s Air Ambulance I thought we should give some sort of reply to your comments. Although we will not comment on a particular patient, in respect of their confidentiality, we can give you some generic information to clarify any confusion. When we are called out, it is either by request for assistance from the London Ambulance Service or another member of the emergency services. We only attend the most serious injuries in London and are called upon for our medical team’s expertise in trauma care. It is our aim to bring the emergency room to the patient in the quickest time possible. We often perform procedures at the incident which are normally only seen in the hospital emergency room, as the patients we are called to may not always survive the distance to hospital. We will help to stabilise the patient and will then make the call as to the closest hospital to deal with that specific injury. There are four trauma hospitals in London which deal with multi injuries, however certain specialities are only available in certain hospitals and our senior trauma doctors will make the call in the patient’s best interest. The distance, time and the patient’s condition will be taken into consideration when deciding on the mode of transport to take them to hospital. I hope this has clarified any confusion. You can learn more about our charity on www.londonsairambula nce.co.uk. We are also on Facebook (London’s Air Ambulance) and Twitter (@thehelipad) if you wish to chat further. London's Air Ambulance
  • Score: 0

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