Gravesend woman arrested in connection with £7950 of bike thefts

News Shopper: Gravesend woman arrested in connection with £7950 of bike thefts Gravesend woman arrested in connection with £7950 of bike thefts

A 21-year-old woman from Gravesend has been arrested in connection with the thefts of high value road bikes used at the Cyclopark totalling £7950.

Kent Police is aware of a small number of reports of thefts of road bikes regularly used at the cycling track in Watling Street and is carrying out enquiries.

Between 5pm on January 1 and 10am the following day, it was reported a GT Grand Tourer carbon bike worth £2,500 and a Giant road bike worth £750 were missing from an address in Old Road East, Gravesend.

Police also received a report after 10am on 21 February of the theft of two high value road bikes from a garage in Luddesdown, Gravesend.

It was reported a Pinarello FP2 worth £1,800 and custom made time trial bike worth £2,900 were missing.

A burglary was also reported at Cyclopark in the early hours of the morning on February 27.

Three bikes parked in front of a shop on the park were reported missing and damage caused to shutters.

Officers carried out a search and the three bikes were located nearby and returned.

Detectives investigating the series of thefts have arrested a 21-year-old woman from Gravesend on suspicion of conspiracy to commit burglary and she has been bailed to April 14 pending further enquiries.

Detective Inspector Mike Worrall of Kent Police said: "My team of detectives are continuing with their enquiries into this series and have made one arrest at this stage.

"I would urge bike owners who use Cyclopark to remain vigilant and report any suspicious activity to police immediately.

"Thieves often see bikes as easy pickings because they are at times often left poorly secured or sometimes not at all.

"Always lock your bike wherever you are, and if possible use two locks made from different materials, as thieves will need to use different methods to cut through them.

"We also recover a large number of stolen and abandoned bikes, of which many are never returned to their rightful owners because simple security measures have not been taken.

"It is not uncommon for police to seize bikes believed to have been stolen, but all too often they are not property marked and we are unable to reunite them with their owners.

"This is why we are urging people to be more security minded about their cycles, by recording the bicycle frame number and taking other precautions such as making sure you have photos of your bike or marking it with SmartWater."

Kent Police recommends registering bikes with www.immobilise.com or www.bikeregister.com to maximise the chances of having it returned.

Community support officers can offer tips and advice to protect your property from thieves.

Comments (5)

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6:43pm Thu 6 Mar 14

HearTheFacts says...

It's take to seconds to lock a bike, or two seconds to nick a bike!. The amount of time I've seen cycles outside of shops unlocked. When you say anything, its ' I'm only going in the shop for a minute!'.
It's take to seconds to lock a bike, or two seconds to nick a bike!. The amount of time I've seen cycles outside of shops unlocked. When you say anything, its ' I'm only going in the shop for a minute!'. HearTheFacts
  • Score: 15

11:33pm Thu 6 Mar 14

Dr. Nick says...

Depends on the type of bike really. Cheap bikes tend to be just left or with easy locks I grant you, however more expensive bikes tend to be locked with a couple of different types of lock to deter casual thieves. My 4K bike for example has 3 different locks and a selection of cables.

But at the end of the day, if someone wants it, they will get it - the same as with my car. Both are covered by insurance, but strangely I would be more upset if my bike went missing than my car. I guess a good bike becomes a part of you.

My point is this: if it is important to you you will look after it better, those bikes you mention are not important to the owners imho.
Depends on the type of bike really. Cheap bikes tend to be just left or with easy locks I grant you, however more expensive bikes tend to be locked with a couple of different types of lock to deter casual thieves. My 4K bike for example has 3 different locks and a selection of cables. But at the end of the day, if someone wants it, they will get it - the same as with my car. Both are covered by insurance, but strangely I would be more upset if my bike went missing than my car. I guess a good bike becomes a part of you. My point is this: if it is important to you you will look after it better, those bikes you mention are not important to the owners imho. Dr. Nick
  • Score: -21

4:36pm Fri 7 Mar 14

HearTheFacts says...

Dr. Nick wrote:
Depends on the type of bike really. Cheap bikes tend to be just left or with easy locks I grant you, however more expensive bikes tend to be locked with a couple of different types of lock to deter casual thieves. My 4K bike for example has 3 different locks and a selection of cables.

But at the end of the day, if someone wants it, they will get it - the same as with my car. Both are covered by insurance, but strangely I would be more upset if my bike went missing than my car. I guess a good bike becomes a part of you.

My point is this: if it is important to you you will look after it better, those bikes you mention are not important to the owners imho.
The belief the cheaper cycles are not stolen, compared to expensive cycles. The statistics show that cycles of a lesser value are high.

The factors behind this is that expensive cycle owners take more care. With cheap cycles, its easier to sell them on. With companies offering £5 for any cycle, regardless of condition. Now someone needing their drug fix, here's the answer. Steal say five bikes a day, may cover addition. Easy no questions asked, easy money!. A lot of crime is linked to drugs.

How many owners of cycles know thier frame number?. Or even that it has a frame number?.
[quote][p][bold]Dr. Nick[/bold] wrote: Depends on the type of bike really. Cheap bikes tend to be just left or with easy locks I grant you, however more expensive bikes tend to be locked with a couple of different types of lock to deter casual thieves. My 4K bike for example has 3 different locks and a selection of cables. But at the end of the day, if someone wants it, they will get it - the same as with my car. Both are covered by insurance, but strangely I would be more upset if my bike went missing than my car. I guess a good bike becomes a part of you. My point is this: if it is important to you you will look after it better, those bikes you mention are not important to the owners imho.[/p][/quote]The belief the cheaper cycles are not stolen, compared to expensive cycles. The statistics show that cycles of a lesser value are high. The factors behind this is that expensive cycle owners take more care. With cheap cycles, its easier to sell them on. With companies offering £5 for any cycle, regardless of condition. Now someone needing their drug fix, here's the answer. Steal say five bikes a day, may cover addition. Easy no questions asked, easy money!. A lot of crime is linked to drugs. How many owners of cycles know thier frame number?. Or even that it has a frame number?. HearTheFacts
  • Score: 8

11:42pm Fri 7 Mar 14

Dr. Nick says...

HearTheFacts wrote:
Dr. Nick wrote:
Depends on the type of bike really. Cheap bikes tend to be just left or with easy locks I grant you, however more expensive bikes tend to be locked with a couple of different types of lock to deter casual thieves. My 4K bike for example has 3 different locks and a selection of cables.

But at the end of the day, if someone wants it, they will get it - the same as with my car. Both are covered by insurance, but strangely I would be more upset if my bike went missing than my car. I guess a good bike becomes a part of you.

My point is this: if it is important to you you will look after it better, those bikes you mention are not important to the owners imho.
The belief the cheaper cycles are not stolen, compared to expensive cycles. The statistics show that cycles of a lesser value are high.

The factors behind this is that expensive cycle owners take more care. With cheap cycles, its easier to sell them on. With companies offering £5 for any cycle, regardless of condition. Now someone needing their drug fix, here's the answer. Steal say five bikes a day, may cover addition. Easy no questions asked, easy money!. A lot of crime is linked to drugs.

How many owners of cycles know thier frame number?. Or even that it has a frame number?.
My point exactly, you just said the same thing - cheaper bikes are stolen as they are easier to take by opportunists. Expensive bikes are harder to take and require more planning. All my bikes are registered with the police for free and even have the marking and sticker on them - it is no guarantee they will not be stolen, but it is at least another deterrent. If anyone is interested in getting this done, this summer the Police will be out and about marking again - just visit the Bromley Buzz Fest in Norman Park this summer, or keep an eye on the Bromley Cyclists website as they help organise it. It is a totally free service and works with the National Immobilise Register.

For more info see: www.bikeregister.com (and) www.bromleycyclists.
org (and) www.immobilise.com
[quote][p][bold]HearTheFacts[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dr. Nick[/bold] wrote: Depends on the type of bike really. Cheap bikes tend to be just left or with easy locks I grant you, however more expensive bikes tend to be locked with a couple of different types of lock to deter casual thieves. My 4K bike for example has 3 different locks and a selection of cables. But at the end of the day, if someone wants it, they will get it - the same as with my car. Both are covered by insurance, but strangely I would be more upset if my bike went missing than my car. I guess a good bike becomes a part of you. My point is this: if it is important to you you will look after it better, those bikes you mention are not important to the owners imho.[/p][/quote]The belief the cheaper cycles are not stolen, compared to expensive cycles. The statistics show that cycles of a lesser value are high. The factors behind this is that expensive cycle owners take more care. With cheap cycles, its easier to sell them on. With companies offering £5 for any cycle, regardless of condition. Now someone needing their drug fix, here's the answer. Steal say five bikes a day, may cover addition. Easy no questions asked, easy money!. A lot of crime is linked to drugs. How many owners of cycles know thier frame number?. Or even that it has a frame number?.[/p][/quote]My point exactly, you just said the same thing - cheaper bikes are stolen as they are easier to take by opportunists. Expensive bikes are harder to take and require more planning. All my bikes are registered with the police for free and even have the marking and sticker on them - it is no guarantee they will not be stolen, but it is at least another deterrent. If anyone is interested in getting this done, this summer the Police will be out and about marking again - just visit the Bromley Buzz Fest in Norman Park this summer, or keep an eye on the Bromley Cyclists website as they help organise it. It is a totally free service and works with the National Immobilise Register. For more info see: www.bikeregister.com (and) www.bromleycyclists. org (and) www.immobilise.com Dr. Nick
  • Score: -22

6:12pm Sat 8 Mar 14

NPTOC40 says...

"Thieves often see bikes as easy pickings". Well the police aren't exactly making it difficult are they? I wish they would treat the epidemic of bike crime for what it is rather than just blaming people for not locking bikes and shrugging their shoulders. Thieves will cut through ANY bike lock. It looks like around 2 bikes a day are reported stolen just in SE10. And it's way too easy to sell stolen bikes.
a) The police should take this crime more seriously and come up with a plan (raiding second-hand bike shops, sting operations etc)
b) Any bike sold on ebay etc should have to have the frame number on the advert, the same as for a car, by law.
"Thieves often see bikes as easy pickings". Well the police aren't exactly making it difficult are they? I wish they would treat the epidemic of bike crime for what it is rather than just blaming people for not locking bikes and shrugging their shoulders. Thieves will cut through ANY bike lock. It looks like around 2 bikes a day are reported stolen just in SE10. And it's way too easy to sell stolen bikes. a) The police should take this crime more seriously and come up with a plan (raiding second-hand bike shops, sting operations etc) b) Any bike sold on ebay etc should have to have the frame number on the advert, the same as for a car, by law. NPTOC40
  • Score: 14

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