'Snowball effect' of drink driving

News Shopper: 'Snowball effect' of drink driving 'Snowball effect' of drink driving

THE "snowball effect" of getting a drink-drive conviction has been highlighted in the Government's latest THINK! campaign.

Millions of people could lose their jobs if they were unable to drive to, or at, work through being caught drinking and driving, the campaign, launched today, shows.

People who drive as part of their job are particularly vulnerable but someone with a conviction could also be denied access to millions more jobs which are eligible for criminal records checks.

These jobs include professional driving jobs, teachers, care workers and jobs in banks and finance.

Any employer can ask to see unspent criminal convictions and research shows that three-quarters of employers admit to taking a criminal conviction into account during the recruitment process.

Launching the "snowball effect" drink-drive campaign Transport Minister Robert Goodwill said: "For many people Christmas is about spending time with friends and family and celebrating, but if drivers have a tipple they should not get behind the wheel.

"Just one drink can put you over the limit and the consequences are devastating. Not only will you be cuffed and put in a cell, but if you're convicted you will lose your licence and, as this research shows, you could even lose your job."

AA president Edmund King said: "Drink-drive convictions have dramatic and traumatic snowball effects. One third of people will lose their jobs and experience years of hiked insurance premiums.

"A snowball might melt away quickly while the effects of a driving ban last way beyond any winter thaw. If you are going to drive - don't drink. If you are going to drink - don't drive."

Comments (4)

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11:32am Wed 4 Dec 13

j.j. says...

It's good that this year's campaign focuses on the personal consequences of drinving under influence. As numerous past comments on this site demonstrate, there are still a lot of people who see driving under the influence as acceptable. Most of the comments that support this view reveal a very selfish thought pattern along the lines ... it's my business if I choose to do this... So hopefully these people will recognise that it in their own interest to stop their irresponsible behaviour.
It's good that this year's campaign focuses on the personal consequences of drinving under influence. As numerous past comments on this site demonstrate, there are still a lot of people who see driving under the influence as acceptable. Most of the comments that support this view reveal a very selfish thought pattern along the lines ... it's my business if I choose to do this... So hopefully these people will recognise that it in their own interest to stop their irresponsible behaviour. j.j.

9:06am Thu 5 Dec 13

right-writes says...

I am not a big fan of the pre-crime concept myself...

If a person commits an offence whilst under the influence of any intoxicating substance they should be tried and sentenced appropriately...

Death caused through drink/drug driving is effectively murder... There is a tariff for that.

Ending a person's career because they changed the colour of some salts in a bottle is not appropriate punishment.

I do not know the statistics, they are usually made up anyway, but I would humbly suggest that deaths and mutilations caused through drunk/drug driving are no lower now than they were in 1967 (Pre-breathalyzer) and before, so how has "the breathalyzer" improved road safety?
I am not a big fan of the pre-crime concept myself... If a person commits an offence whilst under the influence of any intoxicating substance they should be tried and sentenced appropriately... Death caused through drink/drug driving is effectively murder... There is a tariff for that. Ending a person's career because they changed the colour of some salts in a bottle is not appropriate punishment. I do not know the statistics, they are usually made up anyway, but I would humbly suggest that deaths and mutilations caused through drunk/drug driving are no lower now than they were in 1967 (Pre-breathalyzer) and before, so how has "the breathalyzer" improved road safety? right-writes

9:57am Thu 5 Dec 13

papaleigh says...

east europeans seem to like a bevy
east europeans seem to like a bevy papaleigh

10:27am Thu 5 Dec 13

goldenbroomboy says...

papaleigh wrote:
east europeans seem to like a bevy
And Muslims do not, what point are you trying to make?
[quote][p][bold]papaleigh[/bold] wrote: east europeans seem to like a bevy[/p][/quote]And Muslims do not, what point are you trying to make? goldenbroomboy

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