Sweet-toothed Lewisham bailiffs break into wrong flat

News Shopper: Peter Young at his mother's flat Peter Young at his mother's flat

BUNGLING bailiffs broke into the wrong flat, removing items from a 58-year-old woman's home before realising their mistake and leaving without even a note of apology.

Peter Young says the men dragged out a sofa, television and even started chomping through his mother's box of sweets before finding out they were actually meant to be at a neighbouring flat

Mr Young, 38, got an alarming call from a next door neighbour of his mum Marjorie in Boones Road, Lee, on June 3, to say what was happening.

He said: "They drilled through all the locks to get in.

"They took out her computer, her printer, everything else. The cheeky gits, they even opened her sweets and started eating those.

"You just think, I'm sure they're not allowed to do that."

Mr Young, of Orpington, went on: "Once they realised they'd made a mistake then they put it all back.

"They put new locks on the door, but didn't tell anyone, just gave a key to the next door neighbour.

"If the neighbour hadn't called, my mum could have just come home, put her key in the lock and not been able to get in. It's just unreal."

Mrs Young had been at work during the day, and said she was "a bit shocked" by the news.

She said: "I just can't believe that they would come in anywhere without checking the number properly.

"I'm really angry about the fact that my home has been invaded. They touched everything.

"They left no card, no note."

The family claim the front door frame was smashed, a leather sofa was damaged and "pepperpot holes" were drilled through the entrance. They also claim that private papers were rifled through by the intruders.

Mr Young says he is now in discussions with Lewisham Homes to get the front door replaced.

A spokeswoman for Lewisham Homes said the bailiffs had been supplied by the courts rather than the housing association. She said: "Unfortunately a mistake was made when bailiffs attended to enforce an eviction notice on the adjoining flat to Mrs Young’s home, and they entered her property in error.

"We are deeply sorry for this mistake and the distress that this has caused Mrs Young, particularly as resident security is one of our key concerns. We were in immediate contact to explain what happened and to apologise.

"We have spoken to the court bailiffs to ascertain their company actions. We are currently in discussions regarding how to properly compensate Mrs Young for the inconvenience."

Comments (4)

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2:26pm Mon 10 Jun 13

mouthalmighty says...

Everything about this stinks. Particularly the attitudes and behaviour of the bailiffs. The woman must be feeling totally violated.
Everything about this stinks. Particularly the attitudes and behaviour of the bailiffs. The woman must be feeling totally violated. mouthalmighty
  • Score: 0

4:56pm Mon 10 Jun 13

Virtual-Monster says...

Mistakes happen - Employing brain dead imbeciles as bailiffs is one of them.

Maybe they should go back to standing on the doors with a clip board growling "Yer name aint down, you aint coming in"?
Mistakes happen - Employing brain dead imbeciles as bailiffs is one of them. Maybe they should go back to standing on the doors with a clip board growling "Yer name aint down, you aint coming in"? Virtual-Monster
  • Score: 0

5:11pm Mon 10 Jun 13

Gypo.Joe says...

Virtual-Monster wrote:
Mistakes happen - Employing brain dead imbeciles as bailiffs is one of them.

Maybe they should go back to standing on the doors with a clip board growling "Yer name aint down, you aint coming in"?
Sounds like you have had experience with the bailiffs knocking at your door VM.
[quote][p][bold]Virtual-Monster[/bold] wrote: Mistakes happen - Employing brain dead imbeciles as bailiffs is one of them. Maybe they should go back to standing on the doors with a clip board growling "Yer name aint down, you aint coming in"?[/p][/quote]Sounds like you have had experience with the bailiffs knocking at your door VM. Gypo.Joe
  • Score: 0

5:53pm Mon 10 Jun 13

toomush2drink says...

There is no excuse for this, its breaking and entering because they didnt bother to read the warrant correctly.

She should take up a private prosecution for the distress its caused.Just getting the court papers ready will get them on the phone arranging compensation because no bailiff could operate with a criminal conviction against them.

The paper work is clear enough and what doesnt make sense is why they were removing property ?
If it was an eviction the eviction papers normally only entitle them to evict the persons named on it not the property.They have to safely store the property and give the owner of it access to it for a month.

If it was to repay a debt then they must have gained entry previously, before they could break in this time and remove goods.If that is the case then why did they go into the wrong property ?
There is no excuse for this, its breaking and entering because they didnt bother to read the warrant correctly. She should take up a private prosecution for the distress its caused.Just getting the court papers ready will get them on the phone arranging compensation because no bailiff could operate with a criminal conviction against them. The paper work is clear enough and what doesnt make sense is why they were removing property ? If it was an eviction the eviction papers normally only entitle them to evict the persons named on it not the property.They have to safely store the property and give the owner of it access to it for a month. If it was to repay a debt then they must have gained entry previously, before they could break in this time and remove goods.If that is the case then why did they go into the wrong property ? toomush2drink
  • Score: 0

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